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Article
September 1, 1917

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE IN THE SURGICAL TREATMENT OF INTESTINAL STASIS

Author Affiliations

RICHMOND, VA.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(9):714-718. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590360034010
Abstract

Since Sir Arbuthnot Lane brought intestinal stasis into prominence, the literature about it has been prolific. It has been approached from many points of view—surgical, medical and pathologic. It is, of course, an old condition masquerading under a new name. Smithies has called attention to the fact that the typical symptoms of intestinal stasis as described by Lane, such as muddy skin, headache, mental depression, lack of appetite, malodorous sweating, and abdominal aches and pains, are often absent in most pronounced cases of constipation, and that marked displacement of the large bowel, as demonstrated by the Roentgen ray, does not always cause constipation. Pathologists generally have not sustained the extreme views of Lane. That the symptoms as described by him do often exist, however, is common experience, but that they are caused by such marked changes in the colon as to demand its entire removal remains to be proved.

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