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Article
September 8, 1917

ARTHRITIS AND FOREIGN PROTEIN: CHRONIC RHEUMATISM RELIEVED BY INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Orthopedic Clinics of St. Luke's Hospital and the County Hospital.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(10):770-772. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590370006002
Abstract

Patients with chronic arthritis present a more vital problem in economy to the tax payers of the city and county and to the private hospital than almost any other cases. Their relative number for admission is large, and their stay is usually very long. There were 161 acute and 160 chronic arthritic patients in the County Hospital last year. St. Luke's does not admit chronic cases as a rule, yet many arthritic patients constantly receive careful and prolonged care there. Finally, many of these patients must go to the county or state poorhouses or homes for incurables when they have worn out their welcome in the city institutions.

In the spring of 1916, several patients with chronic arthritis appeared on my service at the County Hospital. They gave a history of treatment by "shots into the vein of something which made them chill and relieved their pain." They proved to

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