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May 5, 1917

GUNSHOT FRACTURES OF THE SKULLSTATISTICAL AND CRITICAL REVIEW BASED ON A SERIES OF SEVENTY-FIVE CASES

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(18):1299-1304. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270050001001
Abstract

While I was laboring short-handed in a 1,500 bed hospital during the onset of the Somme push last summer, it was my lot to care for several hundred gunshot fractures of the skull. In spite of the stress of operative and directing work and with no clerical help, I made detailed notes on seventy-five patients, including necropsy records in the fatal ones. To group patients and lighten the work for medical officers and nurses it seemed wise to put patients with head injuries in one ward, using a neighboring ward when an overflow of the thirty-five bed unit occurred. As a routine, spinal puncture, roentgenography and scalp incision were employed to establish diagnosis. We were not supplied with a sphygmomanometer, and so could not make observations on the blood pressure findings.

Routine eye examinations were made in every case. To Major Charles A. Maghy, oculist

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