[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 5, 1917

SEPTIC SORE THROAT: EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDY OF A MILK-BORNE EPIDEMIC AT GALESVILLE, WIS., DUE TO THE USE OF INFECTED MILK

Author Affiliations

Deputy State Health Officers MADISON, WIS.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(18):1307-1309. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270050009003

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

An explosive outbreak of 325 cases of septic sore throat in a community of 941 people directly traceable to an infected milk supply occurred in Galesville, Wis., from Feb. 26 to March 19, 1917. The interesting factors in this epidemic were :

1. The virulence of the infection.

2. The tracing of the source of infection to six cows.

3. The possibility of the cows becoming infected from the milker.

4. The large number of families infected.

5. The small number of contact cases.

6. The short period of incubation.

7. The abrupt checking of the epidemic.

The first case appeared, February 26, and was followed by five cases on the 27th ; two on the 28th ; two, March 1 ; five on the 2d, and seven on the 3d. Sunday, the 4th, forty-four cases appeared. Additional cases appeared daily until, March 14, in response to a request of the local authorities, this investigation was undertaken.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×