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Article
January 2, 1897

EXAMINATIONS IN MEDICINE.AN ENQUIRY INTO THEIR INFLUENCE UPON MEDICAL EDUCATION AND THE BEST METHODS OF CONDUCTING THEM.

Author Affiliations

ASST. SURG. GENERAL U. S. ARMY, PRESIDENT ARMY MEDICAL SCHOOL. WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1897;XXVIII(1):1-5. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440010001001

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Abstract

My subject, that of examinations for medical men, can not fail to have engaged the attention, the very earnest attention, of each one of us at some period of our career. All of us have undergone the trial. Some of the younger physicians present may even now have recently passed through some such ordeal or are about to do so, and none of us are so old as not to have lively recollections of our experiences in this regard.

It has been said that the present is an age of examinations. They have without doubt become greatly multiplied in recent times, and the reason is not difficult to find. The rapid expansion of the bounds of human knowledge leading to widened and prolonged preparation for the professions, especially that of medicine; the institution of the Civil Service, aiming to fill offices by merit and not by favor; increased competition, have

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