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Article
January 2, 1897

ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY AND DIAGNOSIS OF APPENDICITIS.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF DESCRIPTIVE AND SURGICAL ANATOMY, KEOKUK MEDICAL COLLEGE; PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL SURGERY IN ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL, KEOKUK, IOWA.

JAMA. 1897;XXVIII(1):8-10. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440010008001b

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Abstract

If we would correctly estimate the tendencies of appendicitis it will be through an understanding of its etiology, pathology and diagnosis. As the varying anatomy and relations of the appendix have much to do with the origin, course and recognition of appendictis they should receive some consideration. The appendix is an organ absolutely without function. For this reason nature is attempting to rid herself permanently of its presence. At the present rate it will be many generations before it is accomplished, and until then physicians must continue its study. All organs without functional activity have less resistance to abnormal processes than those which are functionally active.

Every conceivable position is occupied by the appendix, but usually its base is in the right iliac fossa. Its tip may be anywhere that its length, from one to six inches, may enable it to reach. In the female its proximal opening into the

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