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Article
May 19, 1917

A CASE CONFIRMATORY OF THE SPINAL FLUID COMPRESSION SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

Attending Neurologist, Harper Hospital DETROIT

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(20):1474. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270050176009
Abstract

Ayer and Viets1 recently reported the rarity of recognition of spinal fluid changes characteristic of cord compression. Their search of the literature, however, brought to light a number of articles, especially in French and German, dealing with the subject and recognizing certain changes as the "spinal fluid compression syndrome."

The abnormal findings were chiefly three: A yellow color or xanthochromia, spontaneous coagulation, and an increase in the cell count. They tabulate twelve cases which have been under their observation, showing findings, treatment and result, and they review the literature quite extensively. Their conclusions are:

1. We believe that changes in the spinal fluid frequently occur as a result of compression of the spinal cord.

2. The principal characteristic of such compression fluid is marked increase of proteins without corresponding cellular increase, obtained under normal pressure.

3. Xanthochromia with massive coagulation, added to the above, makes a more intense reaction

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