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Article
October 7, 1893

RUPTURE OF SMALL INTESTINE—LAPAROTOMY—ONE DEATH, TWO RECOVERIES.

JAMA. 1893;XXI(15):545-546. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420670035013

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Abstract

BY H. C. DALTON, M.D.

ST. LOUIS.

Professor Abdominal and Clinical Surgery, Marion-Sims College of Medicine; late Superintendent St. Louis City Hospital.

Rupture of the intestines is so rare that I am sure the report of the following cases will prove of sufficient interest to the Association to justify me in taking up a few moments of your time. The cases particularly emphasize the urgent need of early interference in such injuries, if we would save our patients from rapid peritonitis and death.

CASE I.—RUPTURE OF JEJUNUM AND MESENTERY—LAPAROTOMY—DEATH.  J. W., æt. 22; laborer; entered the City Hospital in October, 1893. Twenty hours before admission, while stealing a ride on a freight train in Illinois, he fell from the top of the car striking his belly against the handrail in the descent. He was brought to the hospital at 1 P. M. next day. His temperature at that time was

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