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Article
October 6, 1917

RETAINING THE FLOOR OF THE ORBIT IN RESECTION OF THE SUPERIOR MAXILLA

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(14):1140-1143. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590410018005
Abstract

Surgeons are familiar with the fact that the removal of the superior maxilla does not leave the patient in such a state of repellent deformity as one would expect. Furthermore, functions of the parts remaining are not so very much disturbed. The dentist can be of the greatest aid on the oral side, and the arts of the rhinologist remove or alleviate many of the difficulties that arise within the nasopharyngeal cavity.

But Hans Bode1 wisely remarks, "It is very important that the eye shall rest on a substantial support and that the oral and nasal cavities shall be separated from one another."

As early as 1859, Langenbeck preserved the periosteum of the orbit, and Bode tells us that his literary studies reveal the fact that Heine, Jacobs, Israel, Peyrat, Jallaguier, Koenig and Kuester have operated in this way. Koenig, Jr.,2 in 1900, provided support for the eye

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