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Article
October 6, 1917

NOTES ON THE CARE OF THE CRIPPLED SOLDIER IN ENGLAND

Author Affiliations

U. S. A. Captain, M. R. C., U. S. Army; Orthopedic Surgeon, Military Orthopedic Hospital, Shepherds Bush, London, England DETROIT

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(14):1167-1168. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.25910410001012
Abstract

The British Wat Office and the Royal Army Medical Corps early realized that the responsibility of the government to the wounded soldier did not end when he was discharged from hospital with his primary wounds healed, but with his usefulness more or less impaired. They appreciated that to give a man, with a badly united femur, contracted trench feet, or a paralyzed arm, a pension sufficient to keep him alive, and leave him to shift for himself, was economically unsound. They, therefore, undertook the study and perfection of methods to restore each man as nearly as possible to a state of activity and earning power which should approximate or excel that man's state before he went into the war.

The problems were and are huge ones. First to be considered were the difficulties of reconstructive surgery. Each case presented points for study which were outside the experience of the general

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