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Article
October 6, 1917

THE OUTPUT OF BASES AFTER INTAKE OF ACID

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(14):1172. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590410050013
Abstract

The introduction of a nonoxidizable acid, such as the ordinary mineral acids, into the organism must resemble in considerable degree that condition which may result in acidosis. In order to retain its normal capacities, the body must neutralize the foreign acid and get rid of it in some way. Organic acids may be eliminated as such to a certain degree; but any noteworthy accumulation of acid products demands some compensatory elimination of base. Among the ordinarily available resources are the fixed alkalies and alkali earths of the body, as well as ammonia that is "deflected" from the usual course of nitrogenous metabolism. Severe acidosis invariably involves a depletion of the alkali reserves of the body.1 It is well known that an increased output of ammonia attends the appearance of considerable quantities of acid in the organism, whether they are introduced experimentally or arise in metabolism.

The extent to which

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