[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.183.113. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 13, 1917

RECENT BIOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS ON BLOOD AND URINE: THEIR BEARING ON CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE

Author Affiliations

Professor of Biologic Chemistry, Medical School of Harvard University BOSTON

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(15):1209-1214. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590420001001
Abstract

It is generally recognized that progress in the development of any experimental science is more often due to the discovery of new methods than to new and more ingenious applications of old ones.

An unending procession of new remedies and new procedures moves across the field of clinical medicine. The wide attention bestowed on Abderhalden's pregnancy test may be cited as a specific illustration of the eagerness with which the medical profession is waiting for new methods. Brugsch's new nitric acid test for syphilis is another illustration. This test will doubtless prove even more alluring to those who have opportunity to try it; for, whereas the Abderhalden test was complicated and admittedly full of pitfalls, this new test for syphilis seems almost ideal in its simplicity. Its lack of "rhyme or reason" will not deter many from trying it.

In the science of biochemistry, too, we have had a constant

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×