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Article
June 16, 1917

EFFECT OF INGESTION OF COFFEE, TEA AND CAFFEIN ON THE EXCRETION OF URIC ACID IN MAN

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Sheffield Laboratory of Physiological Chemistry, Yale University.

JAMA. 1917;LXVIII(24):1805-1807. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.04270060213006
Abstract

The widespread use of coffee as a beverage, together with the marked physiologic effects attendant on the ingestion of caffein, either directly or as one of the constituents ofcoffee, naturally led physiologic chemists to investigate the fate of caffein in the body. As far back as 1850, Lehmann1 reported that after caffein had been administered in the food, no trace of it as such was found in the urine. Experiments reported by later investigators show widely varying results, but most of them indicate that after coffee has been drunk or caffein administered with the diet, only a very small part of the ingested caffein appears unchanged in the urine.

In the meantime 1-7-dimethylxanthin, 1-monomethylxanthin and 7-monomethylxanthin had been isolated from human urine and carefully studied. Not many years later Albanese,2 in experiments with dogs, and Bondzynski and Gottlieb,3 in experiments with dogs, rabbits and men, demonstrated that

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