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Article
December 2, 1893

RETURN OF VOICE AFTER LARYNGECTOMY.although the lungs and trachea are entirely cut off from communication with the throat and mouth. A Clinical Lecture on the Physiopathology of Voice; illustrated. De livered at lefferson College Hospital, Philadelphia, Oct. 20, 1893.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF LARYNGOLOGY IN THE JEFFERSON MEDICAL COLLEGE OF PHILADELPHIA, ETC.

JAMA. 1893;XXI(23):834-838. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420750004002

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Abstract

I have to show you, gentlemen, a unique case, one of the most remarkable surgical triumphs of the century; and I doubt whether another just like it exists anywhere else at the present time. Nineteen months ago, in the presence of the class, I removed from this man the larynx and the first ring of the trachea, on account of malignant growth (adenosarcoma) protruding externally. The epiglottis was not removed, as it was not involved in the disease. In order to prevent the fluids of the mouth from afterwards descending into the trachea, and the production of septic pneumonia (shluck-pneumonia) with its fatal consequences, (which occurs in a great many cases of this kind after operation), the second ring of the trachea was stitched to the skin in the neck, the first ring having been removed with the larynx. The tracheal orifice can be seen, here, in the middle line

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