[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.194.190. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 2, 1893

SOME OBSERVATIONS ON TREATING CASES OF DIPHTHERIA.Read in the Section on Diseases of Children, at the Forty-fourth Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA, PA. PHYSICIAN TO THE M. E. ORPHANGE OF PHILADELPHIA; MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL STATE MEDICAL PHILADELPHIA COUNTY MEDICAL, PATHOLOGICAL AND OBSTETRICAL SOCIETIES, ETC.

JAMA. 1893;XXI(23):853-857. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420750023002g
Abstract

There is, perhaps, no subject at this time exciting more and deeper interest in the profession, certainly there is none more important than the management of cases of diphtheria. In this connection some general remarks seem necessary with reference to the ravages of the disease. The excess of deaths over births, which is depopulating the French nation to-day, is largely due to diphtheria. In England it is not confined to the large cities alone, but the rural districts are feeling its scourge.The same may be said of the United States, where there is a growing dread of the disease andjustly so, because of the gradual increase of cases, and deaths as well, which quite an extended correspondence with the different State Boards of Health, also the mortuary registers show, conclusively proving two things: 1, its infectiousness; 2, that the general efforts now put forth to stay its progress are inadequate.

×