[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 24, 1917

MIXED INFECTION WITH THE PNEUMOCOCCUS IN EPIDEMIC MENINGITIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Memorial Institute for Infectious Diseases.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(21):1778. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590480032011
Abstract

In a recent communication, Netter and Salanier1 report twenty-two instances of epidemic meningitis in which pneumococci as well as meningococci were found in the spinal fluid. These cases of mixed infection exhibited all the symptoms of meningococcic meningitis, but did not respond to serum treatment and terminated fatally. It is my purpose to call attention to the importance of these observations, and to report an example of this type of meningeal infection.

W. D., a boy, aged 7 months, entered the Cook County Hospital, Sept. 28, 1917, with all the physical signs of meningitis. According to the mother, the illness began suddenly two days before with convulsions, vomiting, stiffness and retraction of the neck, and a staring expression of the eyes. Otherwise the history was negative. The noteworthy physical findings were blindness, marked opisthotonos, orthotonus, and a positive Kernig's sign. The temperature was 103 F. and the pulse rapid

×