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Article
November 24, 1917

THE EFFECT OF RANK ON THE DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(21):1788-1789. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590480042015

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Abstract

The importance of the medical officer in the armies engaged in war, as indicated by the rank and authority given him, is less highly esteemed in this country than in any other, including both our allies and our enemies. Medicine has accomplished great triumphs in the armies of Europe. Under unprecedentedly difficult conditions, sanitation has been so ably maintained that both morbidity and mortality from the infectious diseases are less today in the military than in the civilian population of the warring nations. In the British Army, 80 per cent, of the wounded have been returned to duty. The number of hospitals in France reaches into the hundreds, and for the most part their equipment is excellent. Scientific laboratories are carrying on practical research investigations. Chemists are finding antidotes for the multitudinous poisonous gases turned on by the Germans, and are discovering new compounds to be used offensively. Within twenty-four

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