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July 25, 1885

DOMESTIC CORRESPONDENCE: THE PROFESSION IN PHILADELPHIA AND THE INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS.

P.
Author Affiliations

Philadelphia, July 18, 1885.

JAMA. 1885;V(4):108-109. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.04470020024009

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Abstract

Dear Sir:—The Journal of July 11 contains a letter from your Philadelphia correspondent, in which he states that "there is no dissent to the determination in this city, that what has taken place at New Orleans and at Chicago, to the damage of the Congress, shall not be sanctioned even in appearance, or permitted to stand, as the work of Philadelphia at all, notwithstanding the fact, that a Philadelphian is charged with having had a great deal to do with it."

Your correspondent is very much mistaken. There is dissent, and very great dissent, with the action of the twenty-eight or twenty-nine medical gentlemen. A prominent medical man told me to-day that he had refused to sign the resolutions of the twenty-nine. I did not sign them. I know many medical gentlemen in this city who, with myself, are fully in accord with the action of the American Medical

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