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Article
August 8, 1885

CONCUSSION OF THE BRAIN, FOLLOWED BY FATAL MENINGITIS.

Author Affiliations

OF STUART, IOWA.

JAMA. 1885;V(6):151-152. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391050011001d

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Abstract

On the afternoon of June 13, two boys, aged each about fifteen years, were fighting each other in rather close quarters, when one drew from his pocket a heavy knife, closed, and with a short, quick, upward stroke, he inflicted in the left temporal region of the other a wound, from which blood poured freely. The bystanders, thinking the blow too light to have produced a serious injury, referred the hæmorrhage to the nose. When I reached the spot, a few minutes later, blood still flowed, encouraged by the injudicious local use of water.

Hæmorrhage being checked by pressure, the boy fainted. Soon reviving, he was brought to my office, where the wound was dressed. The sharp corner of the knife handle had made, not a deep cut, in the mass of temporal muscle, about one inch above the mid point of a line drawn from the external canthus of

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