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August 8, 1885


JAMA. 1885;V(6):167-168. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391050027011

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Dear Sir:  In the issue of the Journal of June 27th there is reported a case of "Renal Calculi," which caused inflammation of the kidney, involving the neighboring structure and leading to a fatal termination. This case, though somewhat unique, resembles in some respects a case that occurred some time since in my practice.At the autopsy of the body of Mr. S. the left kidney was contracted and completely disorganized, being merely a sac containing a large irregular calculus with débris. The weight of the calculus was about 200 grains. The right kidney was contracted and granular. The capsule of the left kidney had ruptured on the anterior aspect, where there were several cysts. There was no disease of the liver, gall-bladder, heart, nor other organs. The body of the patient was well nourished and contained a great amount of fat. The cause of death was severe shock.When

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