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Article
December 15, 1917

TREATMENT OF SCIATICA: WITH AN ANALYSIS OF NINETY-ONE CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK.

From the nerologic service of Mount Sinai Hospital.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(24):2032-2034. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590510024011
Abstract

Sciatica, until very recently, was considered a distinct morbid entity. It was defined as a neuralgia of the sciatic nerve due to conditions within the nerve itself, or caused secondarily by organic lesions adjacent to the nerve, its roots or their origin in the cord. In the past few years, however, there has been a tendency in practically all the cases to regard the condition as secondary to some organic lesion.

Déjerine and his school have called attention to the segmentary distribution of the sensory disturbances in some cases of sciatica, and this they consider evidence that the site of the inflammation is in the roots and not in the trunk of the nerve. They have given the name of "radiculitis" to this condition. Wertheim-Salomonson asserts that one half of the cases of sciatica which he observed were due to radiculitis; he is of the opinion that most investigators overlook

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