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September 5, 1885

EPIDEMIC CHOLERA; ITS SYMPTOMS,PATHOLOGY AND TREATMENT.

Author Affiliations

OF MARSHALL, FAUQUIER CO., VA.

JAMA. 1885;V(10):264-266. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391090012001c

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Abstract

Sacred and profane history present graphic details of pestilences or epidemic diseases. In King David's reign, a pestilence destroyed 70,000 men—a calamity which the Bible asserts to have been a judgment of the Almighty to punish a nation for the violation of Divine and physical laws. Thucydides has given an eloquent description of the plague which devastated Attica and the City of Athens during the Peloppone-sian War. A pestilence which prevailed between the years 1345 and 1350 is said to have been so deadly that two-thirds of the human race perished. In the city of London 50,000 dead bodies were buried in one graveyard. It was called the "Black Death."

The mortality of epidemic cholera has never attained to the high figures of such precedents, doubtless for the reason of its modern origin, and because Christian civilization has contributed to mitigate the ills of human life, and medical art is

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