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Article
December 22, 1917

ETIOLOGIC FACTORS IN GROSS LESIONS OF THE LARGE JOINTS: OBSERVATIONS FROM ONE THOUSAND ONE HUNDRED CONSECUTIVE NECROPSIES

Author Affiliations

ANCON, CANAL ZONE

From the board of health laboratory.

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(25):2099-2101. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590520021009
Abstract

The routine performance of a necropsy, generally speaking, does not include a section and an examination of the joints unless the clinical history or the external appearance of the joint happens to indicate the presence of arthritis. There was no departure from this rule at Ancon until Dr. L. B. Bates began the application of the Wassermann test. He soon noticed that a number of the laborers who responded in a positive manner to the test had associated with their clinical history an ill defined type of arthritic symptoms. This feature became so significant among the negro laborers that Dr. Walter Baetz,1 then in charge of the negro medical service, made a clinical study of the acute arthritic conditions occurring in his service. In his report, in 1913, of 100 cases of acute arthritis among negro laborers in the Panama Canal Zone, he thus named the types according to

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