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Article
October 3, 1885

ABSTRACT OF THE ADDRESS OF SAMUEL K. JACKSON, M.D, NORFOLK, VA.,

JAMA. 1885;V(14):374-375. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391130001001a
Abstract

Among the hindrances to a more rapid march was the need of instruments of precision to assist our imperfect senses, and their subsequent invention gave a great impulse to medicine. Another of the hindrances to a more rapid growth, is a want, on the part of practitioners, of a confidence in their resources, a hankering after novelties, and a too-great credulity in the vaunted claims of medicines, and more particularly of combinations of therapeutical agents. They are too apt to allow enterprising pharmacists to do their thinking for them. Without clinical experience, how could they become good advisers as to the employment of therapeutical agents? and what is their testimony worth? The French courts have recently decided that no compound medicines can be sold except by those holding diplomas.

Among the errors of the times is the abandoning of the settled principles of medicine; principles which were the deductions of

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