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Article
October 17, 1885

CONSEQUENCES OF ACUTE AURAL TROUBLES IN CHILDREN WHEN NOT PROPERLY ATTENDED TO.

Author Affiliations

OF LITTLE ROCK, ARK.

JAMA. 1885;V(16):426-428. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391150006002b
Abstract

In examining many persons one is struck with the varying degrees of hearing power in different individuals, and in different ears of the same individual. So much so is this the case that it has been extremely puzzling to fix a standard of hearing power, even though the character of the test be agreed on, which is in itself a difficult problem. But, to meet all peculiarities, we will presume the various methods in common use are tried on each person under test, and a comparative estimate deducted therefrom. In this manner there is found a very great difference even in persons of presumably normal condition—persons who have no catarrhal affection and no history of ear disease. If one selects for his examination persons beyond middle life he will find few whose hearing, reaches the highest standard. Causes arising in the course of life from climate, mode of living, habits

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