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Article
October 31, 1885

THE USE OF THE OPHTHALMOSCOPE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF BRAIN DISEASE.

Author Affiliations

FORMERLY SURGEON TO THE EYE AND EAR DEPARTMENT OF THE ST. JOHN (CANADA) PUBLIC HOSPITAL, AND PROFESSOR OF DISEASES OF THE EYE AND EAR AT THE BALTIMORE POLYCLINIC AND POST-GRADUATE MEDICAL SCHOOL.

JAMA. 1885;V(18):477-480. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391170001001
Abstract

Our knowledge of the physiology and pathology of the central nervous system is so limited, the diagnosis of brain lesions so difficult, the well known conditions of the eye in those lesions so unmentioned or dubiously mentioned by the text-books on medicine, as to afford me some excuse for urging the claims of the ophthalmoscope in the study of the intra-ocular end of a brain nerve, during its structural changes which are connected with intra-cranial disease. As the subject embraces a limited personal experience, I freely admit the testimony of such authorities as Drs. Allbut, Jackson, Gowers, and incidentally many others.

While the nature of many diseases within the chest and abdomen is revealed to touch and the ear, the maladies of that most inaccessible part of the body—the cranium—give out no certain sound, and will not disclose themselves to any wizard touch; so it remained for the genius of

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