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October 31, 1885

SUN-BLINDNESS.

Author Affiliations

SURGEON TO THE ILLINOIS CHARITABLE EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY.

JAMA. 1885;V(18):483-485. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391170007001b
Abstract

The denger of blindness from the direct rays of the sun, which appears to have been generally recognized not only by the medical profession but also by the laity of the past generation, is apparently unrecognized to-day. During the recent eclipse, many might have been seen looking at it with the naked eye. It is not uncommon for patients to tell the physician, as a proof of strong vision, that they can look steadily at bright lights, and even at the sun without blinking. Children not infrequently undertake competitive trials to see which can gaze longest and most steadily at the sun.

In many of the recent smaller works on ophthalmology the subject of sun-blindness is not mentioned. Nettleship, Lawson, Williams, Schweiger and De Wecker refer to the possibility of blindness being caused by flashes of lightning, by the bright glare from snow and from a too prolonged gaze at

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