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Article
December 5, 1885

IS TYPHOID FEVER EVER OF SPONTANEOUS ORIGIN?

Author Affiliations

OF TECUMSEH, MICH.

JAMA. 1885;V(23):626. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391220010001c

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Abstract

Whether typhoid fever is or is not of spontaneous origin, remains an unsettled question. Murchison taught that it is of spontaneous origin. Many German man writers are of the opposite opinion. In country practice we not unfrequently see cases like the following, with a distinct clinical history of typhoid fever:

H. P., family consisting of wife and four children, living in a rural district, where families are separated by distances of a quarter or half a mile. The eldest child, a girl aged 11 years, was attacked with typhoid fever on October 10th, 1884, and was attended throughout her illness by Dr. North, of this place. The disease assumed a malignant form, and the patient died on the ninth day after taking her bed. Three weeks after her death the mother, aged 35, and a son, aged 7 years, were attacked with fever. During the first week of their illness

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