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December 26, 1885

THE DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF ANGINA PECTORIS WHEN ASSOCIATED WITH SUDDEN DEATH.

JAMA. 1885;V(26):709-710. doi:10.1001/jama.1885.02391250009003

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Abstract

Within the last few months the country has been startled by the sudden death of at least six public men: Emery A. Storrs, the well-known lawyer and wit of Chicago, Josh. Billings, General McClellan, Mr. Hendricks, H. B. Claflin and Mr. Vanderbilt. So far as we have been able to learn, an autopsy was not held in the case of any of them. Hence the cause of death is not exactly known, although this can be inferred either from the previous history or the mode of death.

In the case of Mr. Vanderbilt the exitus lethalis was extremely sudden and, so far as reported, was not heralded by any prodromata. He was stricken down in the midst of apparently vigorous health, while engaged in earnest conversation with a railroad rival. In all probability he was under the influence of strong emotion. Death was attributed to apoplexy, but, notwithstanding the folly

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