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Article
July 3, 1915

THE CULTIVATION OF VACCINE VIRUS IN VIVO

JAMA. 1915;LXV(1):34. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580010042018
Abstract

The desirability of obtaining a vaccine virus free from extraneous organisms is evident. In the vast majority of vaccinations, especially in later years, no ill effects have followed; occasionally, however, owing chiefly to the presence of extraneous organisms, a severe reaction at the site of vaccination occurs. This has been severe enough at times to raise objection on the part of others to submitting to vaccination. For this reason, efforts have been made by laboratory workers to reduce the number of bacteria in vaccine virus, either by growing the organism in pure culture, or by subjecting the vaccine pulp to the action of various antiseptics, or by a passage through the skin of certain animals, such as the rabbit, to bring about the same result.

Usually in the preparation of vaccine virus, glycerin in different percentages is added to the vaccine pulp, and the resulting mixture is allowed to remain

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