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Article
July 24, 1915

A REVIEW OF THE FOOD AND DRUG SITUATION

JAMA. 1915;LXV(4):334-335. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580040044019
Abstract

Even the casual observer of public sentiment and activities in the United States, during the past decade, cannot have escaped noting the steadily increasing interest on the part of the people at large in the educational work of the American Medical Association and other forces directed against frauds in medicine. The Board of Trustees of the Association has evidently felt, as is indicated in a recent special report,1 that the time has come to survey the situation and inquire whether the vigorous protests so long made by the Association against the exploitation of both the medical profession and the public by proprietary interests have borne fruits. At junctures such as this, it is sometimes helpful to view the situation with different eyes, to let independent observers present their aspect of the story, and, further, to take account of the work still undone as well as the tasks accomplished. Such

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