[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 24, 1915

THE CORPUS LUTEUM AND SECONDARY SEX CHARACTERS

JAMA. 1915;LXV(4):337-338. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580040047022
Abstract

Each year is bringing new evidence in regard to the importance of the tissue included in the corpus luteum1 for certain of the animal functions. It undoubtedly contains substances which inhibit ovulation, in illustration of which the novel effect of injection of extracts of desiccated substance of the corpus luteum of the cow on ovulation in fowls has already been described.2 The assertion has frequently been made that the chief factor in exciting the growth of the mammary glands during pregnancy is some chemical substance — a so-called hormone — reaching the blood stream from an organ associated with the maternal functions. Included in the suggested sources of this stimulating product has been the corpus luteum — the tissue produced in the ovary as the result of the discharge of an ovum. Evidence has been brought forward that the corpus luteum may cause a certain degree of hypertrophy

×