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Article
July 31, 1915

THE PROGNOSIS OF CONGENITAL CLUBFOOT: AND ITS RELATION TO NONOPERATIVE TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

Assistant in Surgery, Orthopedic Department, Massachusetts General Hospital; Assistant Orthopedic Surgeon, Boston Dispensary; Assistant Surgeon to the New England Peabody Home for Crippled Children BOSTON

From the Orthopedic Department of The Children's Hospital, Boston.

JAMA. 1915;LXV(5):375-380. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580050003002
Abstract

It has been truthfully said that a bad clubfoot is a stigma on the medical community in which its possessor has been reared. While there are today fewer opportunities for such condemnation than in the past, yet badly deformed and even untreated cases may be seen, and partially cured and relapsed feet are all too common. Such being the case, pertinent questions naturally arise in the consideration of every clubfoot. What is the outlook for form and function? If a good result is to be expected, how long will it take? What form of treatment should be employed, and how practicable will it be? For the physician not especially trained, such questions will be difficult to answer; even the man of experience will be guarded in his replies, for there are many factors entering into the result. What, then, is the prognosis of congenital clubfoot, and on what does it

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