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Article
July 31, 1915

THE INTELLIGENCE EXAMINATION AND EVALUATION: AND A NEW INTELLIGENCE EXAMINATION SHEET

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University; Attending Physician, Psychotherapy Room, Vanderbilt Clinic NEW YORK

JAMA. 1915;LXV(5):399-404. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580050027007
Abstract

The examination and evaluation of a child's intelligence is a most difficult procedure. No method of absolute computation of the normal general mental ability exists, not even a relative computation, and, at best, our conclusions are based on single facts which we ascertain. In other words, we estimate the whole by gaging a separate part1 or, better still, several separate parts.2 How accurately, it must be asked, can this be done? About as accurately as anything, perhaps, that is in largest measure subjective. Using precisely the same methods, my results and yours may evidence remarkable divergencies. Much will depend on one's knowledge3 of the normal and abnormal child, and more still on wide experience in examining and treating such.

But there is not even an absolute normal. The pendulum of intelligence may swing a minor length to right or left and still be within accepted bounds. A

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