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Article
September 4, 1915

INTRATRACHEAL ETHER ANESTHESIA IN THE SURGERY OF THE BRAIN AND SPINAL CORD

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University.

JAMA. 1915;LXV(10):869-872. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580100033010
Abstract

Intratracheal insufflation anesthesia has advantages over the older forms of administration, especially in the surgery of the brain and spinal cord.

Since the introduction in 1909 of this method,1 intratracheal insufflation anesthesia has been employed successfully in the Johns Hopkins and many other clinics in all types of cases; but as its general use is unnecessary, it has been employed in this hospital chiefly in operations about the head and neck, and in the thorax and spinal canal. Its advantages over other methods in operations on the brain and spinal cord have been so striking that I feel it will not be amiss to call attention to some of them, in the hope that the method may receive a more careful consideration.

The distinguishing features of this method, as pointed out by Meltzer,2 are as follows:

1. "By bringing the pure air directly to the larger bronchi, and

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