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Article
September 4, 1915

THE USE OF CONVALESCENT AND NORMAL BLOOD IN THE TREATMENT OF SCARLET FEVER

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Research Laboratory and the Willard Parker Hospital, Department of Health.

JAMA. 1915;LXV(10):875-877. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580100039012
Abstract

Beneficial effects have been obtained at the Willard Parker Hospital during the past seven months in the treatment of severe forms of scarlet fever with intramuscular1 injections of fresh human blood, either convalescent or normal. In a number of such patients, in whom the prognosis seemed doubtful and occasionally even absolutely poor, the life saving effect of from 6 to 8 ounces of blood, repeated once or twice at intervals of four or five days, has encouraged us sufficiently to recommend the treatment in the severer forms of the disease.

The intravenous injection of fairly large quantities (from 2 to 3½ ounces) of convalescent serum has given good results in the hands of Reiss and Jungman,2 and of R. Koch.3 This requires greater skill, and necessitates wasting more than 60 per cent, of the blood. These disadvantages are easily avoided by the simple intramuscular injection of whole

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