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Article
September 18, 1915

INFANTILE SCURVY: II. A NEW ASPECT OF THE SYMPTOMATOLOGY, PATHOLOGY AND DIET

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Research Laboratory, Department of Health, New York City.

JAMA. 1915;LXV(12):1003-1006. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580120015005
Abstract

Infantile scurvy is commonly regarded as a disorder characterized by malnutrition, by typical changes in the structure of the bones, and by hemorrhages in various parts of the body, occurring most frequently in the gums and beneath the periosteum. The descriptions of the pathologic anatomy are remarkable for their singleness of point of view, whether we consult the textbooks on the diseases of children, or special monographs on this subject. In one and all, attention is directed almost solely to the bony lesions, more especially to the alterations in the microscopic appearance of the long bones, which are constant and characteristic of the disease. On further investigation it is found that this circumscribed point of view of the pathology of this disease has been maintained almost constantly since Barlow first placed its pathology on a firm basis over thirty years ago. Barlow1 also reported an infiltration of the muscles

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