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Article
October 2, 1915

STREPTOCOCCUS BACTEREMIA IN ENDOCARDITIS: ITS PRESENCE BEFORE AND DURING THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENDOCARDIAL SIGNS

Author Affiliations

Assistant in Clinical Medicine; Junior Assistant Physician, Toronto General Hospital; Assistant Demonstrator in Pathology; Lecturer in Bacteriology; Fellow in Pathology and Bacteriology TORONTO, ONTARIO

From the Department of Bacteriology and Department of Medicine, University of Toronto.

JAMA. 1915;LXV(14):1159-1163. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580140009003
Abstract

The frequent occurrence of a bacteremia has long been suspected in certain cases in which blood cultures have always been negative. One has often felt that our blood-culture methods were very imperfect, that we failed to grow an organism when one was present. Rosenow's methods1 are a decided advance and have placed in our hands means of investigating a large variety of diseases from which may come findings that will change present views of common diseases. The importance and wide range of the pathogenic influence of streptococci will become generally better appreciated and the association of certain diseases formerly often observed is even now being placed on a definite bacteriologic foundation.

In the heart clinic recently established at the Toronto General Hospital, in connection with the general medical outpatient clinic, it was felt that blood-culture methods similar to Rosenow's might well be applied to the investigation of cases of

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