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Article
October 16, 1915

THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE BLOOD IN SHOCK

JAMA. 1915;LXV(16):1371-1372. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580160055023
Abstract

It almost requires courage to venture on any added discussion of the subject of shock. A multiplicity of more or less isolated facts pertaining to shock have been woven into the fabrics of belief of varied kinds. One of the incentives for increasing the variety and number of hypotheses in regard to shock lies in the eminently practical aspects of the problems that they encompass. A really tenable explanation of shock would find prompt service in the routine of the practitioner. The secretary of commerce recently remarked, in an address entitled "First Get the Facts,"1 that "the truth of yesterday is not that of today. The truth of today is but the parent of that which is to be tomorrow.... Where prejudice is, truth is so far excluded, for no judgment given in advance of known truth is either sound or safe." Therefore it is essential in any progressive

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