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Article
October 16, 1915

THE SOY BEAN, ITS ENZYMES AND CARBOHYDRATES

JAMA. 1915;LXV(16):1372-1373. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580160056024
Abstract

The soy bean (Glycine hispida) is an annual leguminous plant, a native of southeastern Asia. In Japan and China, where it has been grown from time immemorial, it is used for human food and is an important crop in many provinces.1 Over two hundred varieties of the bean are reported, and many and varied kinds of food are made from it. Though known in Europe since the latter part of the eighteenth century, and in the United States since 1829, it long remained a botanic curiosity in both places. It was introduced into the United States on the return of the Perry expedition from Japan in 1853. For more than twenty-five years it has been under investigation by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and by some of the state agricultural departments, and is just now beginning to take a place as a farm crop. The North Carolina Experiment

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