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Article
October 30, 1915

SUDDEN BLINDNESS DUE TO SUPPURATION OF THE ACCESSORY NASAL SINUSES: WITH REPORT OF THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

EL PASO, TEXAS

JAMA. 1915;LXV(18):1513-1520. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580180017007
Abstract

That the intimate anatomic relations existing between the nasal accessory sinuses and the orbital contents has caused much eye complication has long been well known, but it is only within the last few years that special attention has been given this subject, as is shown by the literature on the subject.

In the last three years I have had in my practice three cases of sudden monocular blindness, which were diagnosed as due to nasal suppuration, and cured by endonasal treatment. These cases were of such a nature that diagnosis was not easy, one case being diagnosed by the presence of central color scotoma for red and green; one by dilated pupil, and one by dilated pupil, color scotoma and involvement of the ocular muscle. These cases led me to investigate the ophthalmic literature, to see if by tabulating the symptoms of all cases reported there would not be found

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