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Article
June 3, 1911

THE FOLLY OF SENDING TUBERCULOUS PATIENTS AWAY FROM MEDICAL SUPERVISION

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1911;LVI(22):1638-1639. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560220014004
Abstract

Case 1.  —Mrs. N., aged 44, in well-to-do circumstances, came to my office Oct. 14, 1907. She had been perfectly well until four months previously, when she developed symptoms of cough, expectoration, etc., and her physician told her that she had tuberculosis of the lungs and that she should go to the country. This was the complete advice he gave her, telling her neither where to go nor what to do. Being a woman of intelligence, she made inquiries among lay people and heard, among other places, of a town in a neighboring state in which there is a large sanatorium for tuberculous patients. She went to this town, which contains a number of physicians experienced in the treatment of tuberculosis, but having been given no advice about what to do and no directions about seeing a physician, she thought it was necessary only to remain in the town until

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