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Article
June 3, 1911

THE RARITY OF TABETIC AND PARETIC CONDITIONS IN THE NEGRO: A CASE OF TABES IN A FULL-BLOOD NEGRESS

Author Affiliations

Visiting Neurologist to Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, Consulting Neurologist, Presbyterian Hospital, Assistant to Chair on Diseases of the Nervous System, Tulane University NEW ORLEANS

JAMA. 1911;LVI(22):1645-1646. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560220021008

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Abstract

It is a matter of belief among neurologists who have followed the question of nervous diseases among negroes that the so-called parasyphilitic conditions—tabes and paresis—do not occur in the full-blood African. My own experience in our hospital wards and clinics, where a good percentage of the material is drawn from the colored population, has convinced me of the great rarity of such conditions in the unmixed negro, but I have on two or three occasions seen unquestionably full-blood blacks suffering from tabes. Some accident has in each instance, however, until the present, militated against my getting the proper data for recording the observation. The prevalence of these diseases in the mulatto is undisputed, though they are much less frequent than in the white.

The rarity of parasyphilitic states in the Ethiopian is all the more notable when we contemplate the fact that negroes are practically without morals and that their

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