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Article
November 13, 1915

THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF RINGWORM AND FAVUS OF THE SCALP

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

JAMA. 1915;LXV(20):1717-1718. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580200031009
Abstract

In a recent case report of "Two Favus Families,"1 I illustrated some of the results of neglecting to attend properly to every case of favus of the scalp as soon as it is discovered.

Ringworm and favus of the scalp are not common diseases in many of our smaller cities and towns. The importance, therefore, of properly caring for the early cases, in order to prevent their spread, is often insufficiently appreciated by the health authorities and physicians of such localities.

In addition to this, the profusion of drugs recommended for these diseases, as well as the lack of detailed information of the method of carrying out the treatment and of what is expected from it, leave the physician, who is unfamiliar with these diseases, uncertain what to do.

As ringworm and favus are closely related, and as their treatment is similar, they may well be considered together. Both

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