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Article
November 20, 1915

VIABILITY OF BACILLUS TYPHOSUS IN ICE CREAM

Author Affiliations

SYRACUSE, N. Y.

From the Department of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, Harvard Medical School.

JAMA. 1915;LXV(21):1795-1797. doi:10.1001/jama.1915.02580210029009
Abstract

The use of various frozen foods and confections in which milk and milk products serve as a basis or constituent has become so great as to demand serious attention from sanitarians. The persistence of the typhoid bacillus in milk and milk products is well known, and many cases and epidemics are recorded which have been transmitted by this food. It is also known that Bacillus typhosus is not a normal inhabitant of milk. In only one instance,1 and this is not accepted by some bacteriologists, has Bacillus typhosus been demonstrated in the flesh and organs of the cow. Through polluted water, from the hands or person of convalescents or carriers, or in some similar way the bacillus gains entrance into milk. In other words, Bacillus typhosus in milk and milk products comes from human sources. It is for these reasons that the milk products which are handled the most

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