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June 17, 1911

THE EFFECT OF INJECTIONS OF INDOL AND TYROSIN IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

From the Laboratories of the Cincinnati Hospital.

JAMA. 1911;LVI(24):1796-1797. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560240026012
Abstract

During the past year we commenced a series of experiments on rabbits and white rats, the object of which was to discover what relation chronic intoxications with some of the lower derivatives of protein decomposition bore to changes in the adrenals and kidneys. We had a suspicion that indol might have, in the process of secretion, or in the process of transformation into indican, or both, an effect in producing changes in the organs which would indicate hyperactivity of certain organs (the liver, and perhaps the adrenals) or irritative changes in others (the kidneys). There seemed to be some basis for this suspicion in the fact that indicanuria, especially when it is of well-marked degree, is accompanied by albuminuria and cylindruria. It seemed useful to discover, therefore, whether injections of indol would produce any noticeable changes in the kidneys; and, since the liver has been supposed to be the site

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