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Article
June 24, 1911

TRAUMA AS A CAUSE OF AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS

Author Affiliations

Assistant Neurologist to the Philadelphia General Hospital, and to the Neurological Dispensary of the University Hospital PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1911;LVI(25):1876-1877. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560250012006
Abstract

The following cases have been studied with a view to estimating the correct relation of the trauma which in each case preceded the symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Case 1.  —I examined a mechanic, aged 44, in the dispensary of the University Hospital in 1909. Five years before that date he had fallen 12 feet and injured his back sufficiently to keep him in a hospital for two months. After four years of normal health he caught his right hand in the machine which he tended, badly tearing the soft tissues, and again was forced to spend two months in a hospital. On resuming work, he immediately felt that the injured hand was weak, awkward and easily fatigued. The lameness and ensuing atrophy spread up the limb to the shoulder, so that within twelve months the right upper extremity was nearly useless, while the left hand had begun to show

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