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Article
July 8, 1911

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF RETINAL HEMORRHAGE: BASED ON A STUDY OF THE SUBSEQUENT HISTORY OF ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-SEVEN CASES

Author Affiliations

PROVIDENCE, R. I.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(2):99-102. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260070103004
Abstract

The various types of retinitis seen during a practice of more than a score of years have emphasized the fact that the therapeutic measures at our command in this condition are practically valueless. If recovery occurs, it must be ascribed to the recuperative powers of Nature, rather than to any effort of our own. Except in the albuminuric type, the prognostic significance of the disease has not been sufficiently appreciated to warrant the text-books in succinctly stating the fact, or to influence us in caring for the future welfare of the patient rather than devoting our entire energies to the relief of the existing condition.

It was to ascertain whether other than the albuminuric forms of retinitis were as significant of grave termination that I have made a study of 187 cases of retinitis occurring in private practice since 1890. The much larger number seen in my hospital service has

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