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July 8, 1911

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ANAPHYLAXIS IN CARCINOMA: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

From the Cincinnati Hospital Laboratory.

JAMA. 1911;LVII(2):103-104. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.04260070107006
Abstract

The series of experiments was undertaken to show the difference, if any exists, between the blood of normal individuals and those suffering from carcinoma.1 To demonstrate this the anaphylatic relation was employed.

Young guinea-pigs were used in the three experiments. Each pig, sensitized with blood-serum of a carcinomatous individual, had as a control pig of like weight, sensitized with normal blood-serum. At the height of the sensitization period—ten to fourteen days—each pig, cancer and control, received a large dose of serum from a cencerous individual.

REPORTS OF EXPERIMENTS 

Experiment 1.  —February 9: Serum A was obtained from vein of normal male adult, aged 40; Serum B, from a negro woman, suffering from a non-ulcerating carcinoma of the breast, with slight involvement of the axillary glands, the diagnosis having been confirmed by the microscope. Serums A and B were each diluted 1:50 with normal salt solution.February 10: Guinea-pigs were

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