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Article
August 15, 1896

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE IN APOPLEXY.

Author Affiliations

HARVARD, 1856; UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, 1857. NEW YORK.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(7):360-362. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430850020001e

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Abstract

Presuming that the Section I have the honor to address is a board of medical police whose business it is to detect the pre-stages of diseases and to procure their prevention, if not their birth, the subject is then legitimately up for thought and has an ever-present living importance. The press rarely appears without some reference to apoplexy. To-day it is Baron de Hirsch's death cabled across the Atlantic in thousands of words and eagerly read by the public who love and appreciate such wealthy nature's noblemen. The press also, with the confidence conferred by its position, affirms that champagne freely drank caused his apoplexy within a few hours. But it must have had pre-stages longer than these few hours. This idea was expressed by the late Dr. F. A. Sawyer, Vice-President Massachusetts Medical Society, who told his son that his death would be from apoplexy, as it was. My

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